Events

calendar

Mike Lubell: SCIENCE UNDER THE POPULIST GUN

April 28, 2017, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Title: SCIENCE UNDER THE POPULIST GUN

Speaker: Mike Lubell, City College of New York

Abstract: For more than half a century science and technology have been the principal drivers of economic growth in the United States. Today, by some estimates they account for as much as 85 percent of the increase in the gross domestic product (GDP). But, while the nation as a whole has prospered economically, a majority of the population has benefitted only marginally. Wage gains have not kept pace with productivity growth, and for more than 15 years manufacturing jobs have suffered from technological displacement. Once thought to be immune to such pressures, service employment has also begun to reflect the march of technology. Automation, artificial intelligence and deep learning – all stemming from science – have the potential to play extraordinarily disruptive roles in the future labor force.
The 2010 election sparked the rise of the Tea Party, and the 2014 election transformed an upstart movement into much wider spread of populism. Donald Trump’s success in the 2016 general election and the unexpected strength of Bernie Sanders in the Democratic primary demonstrated the rapid growth of the movement. In reaching the White House, President Trump promised to bring back manufacturing jobs by rewriting trade pacts, imposing tariffs on imported goods and deregulating industry. He has also promised to bring back coal mining by loosening environmental restrictions. He is almost certain to fail in delivering on his jobs promises because his proposed fixes will pale in the face of accelerating technological impacts.
While extensive polling has shown that Americans continue to have warm feelings for science, the survey results also show that the support is shallow. If workers continue to feel the adverse effects of technology on the job market, there is a significant potential for a backlash against technology. The science community needs to prepare itself for that possibility by engaging with the public more effectively and helping social scientists and lawmakers to develop policies that mitigate the adverse impacts of technology on the American workforce.

Host: Halperin

Speaker Schedule

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, colloquium


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

April 28, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


TTitle: A New Era of Seesaw Phenomenology for a New Era of Colliders

Speaker: Richard Ruiz, Durham

Abstract: The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is operating spectacularly and, for the first time, directly probing mass scales well above the electroweak scale. Thus far, LHC data tell us that new particles, in they are still accessible, must be very heavy and/or very weakly coupled. However, for a broad class of TeV-scale neutrino mass models, e.g., Left-Right Symmetry and Inverse Seesaw, these regions of parameter space correspond to collider signatures that are qualitatively and quantitatively different from those developed in pre-LHC times. We present several new Seesaw collider signatures for these parameter spaces and show the greatly expanded discovery potential at the 13 TeV LHC and hypothetical future 100 TeV very large hadron collider.

 

 

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, HEP


Northwestern University's Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics
CIERA 8th ANNUAL PUBLIC LECTURE

-- Free and open to the public.
-- No registration or ticket required.
-- Campus parking lots are unrestricted after 4:00 pm.
-- Room: Tech LR3 (enter through the main entrance, turn right)

Dr. Rainer Weiss, Professor of Physics, Emeritus
Massachusetts Institute of Technology on behalf of the
Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) Scientific Collaboration

Talk Abstract:
The recent observation of gravitational waves from the merger of binary black holes opens a new way to learn about the universe as well as to test General Relativity in the limit of strong gravitational interactions – the dynamics of massive bodies traveling at relativistic speeds in a highly curved space-time. The lecture will describe some of the difficult history of gravitational waves proposed exactly 100 years ago. The concepts used in the instruments and the methods for data analysis that enable the measurement of gravitational wave strains of 10-21 and smaller will be presented. The results derived from the measured waveforms, their relation to the Einstein field equations and the astrophysical implications are discussed. The talk will end with our vision for the future of gravitational wave astronomy.

Image credit: Ken Richardson


Abstracts to be added.

 

Please note: This is a Thursday. 


Title: Novel magnetism and local symmetry breaking in a Mott insulator with strong spin orbit interactions

 

Speaker: Vesna Mitrovic, Brown University

 

Abstract: Study of the combined effects of strong electronic correlations with spin-orbit coupling (SOC) represents a central issue in quantum materials research. Predicting emergent properties represents a huge theoretical problem since the presence of SOC implies that the spin is not a good quantum number. Existing theories propose the emergence of a multitude of exotic quantum phases, distinguishable by either local point symmetry breaking or local spin expectation values, even in materials with simple cubic crystal structure such as Ba2NaOsO6. Experimental tests of these theories by local probes are highly sought for. Our local measurements designed to concurrently probe spin and orbital/lattice degrees of freedom of Ba2NaOsO6 provide such tests [1]. We show that a canted ferromagnetic phase which is preceded by local point symmetry breaking is stabilized at low temperatures, as predicted by quantum theories involving multipolar spin interactions [2]. Specifically, we find that the ferromagnetic state is in fact a type of canted ferromagnet with two sub-lattice magnetization, and that cubic symmetry breaking occurs at a temperature above the Néel temperature and it involves deformation of oxygen octahedra presumably reflecting a complicated pattern of staggered orbital order. Our findings are in startlingly good agreement with theoretical predictions based on quantum models [2]. Thus, our results, to be presented, establish that such quantum models represent an appropriate theoretical framework for predicting emergent properties in materials with both strong correlations and SOC, in general.

[1] L. Lu, M. Song, W. Liu, A. P. Reyes, P. Kuhns, H. O. Lee, I. R. Fisher, and V. F. Mitrovic, Nature Communications, 8, 14407 (2017).
[2] G. Chen, R. Pereira, and L. Balents, Phys. Rev. B, 82, 174440 (2010).


Title: Quantum Nonlinear Optics: Nonlinear Optics Meets the Quantum World

Speaker: Robert Boyd

Abstract: This presentation first recalls the historical development of the field of nonlinear optics, starting from its inception in 1961. It then reviews some of its more recent developments, including especially how nonlinear optics has become a crucial tool for the developing field of quantum technologies. Fundamental quantum processes enabled by nonlinear optics, such as the creation of squeezed and entangled light states, are reviewed. These concepts are illustrated by means of specific applications, such as the development of secure communication systems based on the quantum states of light.

Host: Selim

Speaker Schedule

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, colloquium


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

May 5, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


Title: Measurement driven modeling of quantum and classical dynamical systems

Speaker: Denyis Bondar, Princeton University 

Abstract: In this talk, we will provide an answer to the question: “What kind of observations and assumptions are minimally needed to formulate a physical theory?” Our answer to this question leads to the new systematic approach of Operational Dynamical Modeling (ODM), which allows to deduce equations of motions from time evolution of observables. Using ODM, we are not only able to re-derive well-known physical theories, but also infer novel physical dynamics (and solve open problems) in the realm of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics.

 

 

Host: Tamar Seideman

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, AMO


calendar

Desika Narayanan: TBA

May 9, 2017, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Title: TBA


Speaker: Desika Narayanan, Haverford College

Host: Alex Richings

Abstract: TBA

 

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, Astrophysics


calendar

Maxim Popselov: TBA

May 12, 2017, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Title: TBA

Speaker: Maxim Popselov, Perimeter

Abstract: TBA

Host: Andre

Speaker Schedule

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, colloquium


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

May 12, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


Steve Zepf (Michigan State)

Hosts: Raffaella Margutti & Vicky Kalogera

The IMF in Early-Type Galaxies and also their UV Upturn

I will discuss several programs aimed at understanding how early-type galaxies and their globular clusters form. The stellar initial mass function (IMF) in early type galaxies is a critical parameter for many aspects of galaxy evolution, yet it is difficult to constrain because all of the massive stars in the galaxies are long dead, and the lowest mass stars contribute very little light. I will present results from our study of the number of low-mass X-ray binaries in the field of eight early-type galaxies. We show that the data are consistent with an IMF in which the relative number of massive stars does not vary with early-type galaxies properties. I will also discuss a project aimed at understanding the far-ultraviolet emission from globular clusters. We show that metal-rich globular clusters in a number of galaxies are much brighter in the FUV than expected from simple stellar populations models, but are well fit by models with extensive "second-generation" populations enhanced in helium. This demonstrates the ubiquity of the second generation phenomena in globular clusters, and also suggests that the FUV upturn in elliptical galaxies may originate in globular clusters.


calendar

David Martinez: TBA

May 15, 2017, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

TTitle: TBA

Speaker: David Martinez, IIT
 

Abstract: TBA

 

 

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, HEP


A free, public outreach event hosted by CIERA (Northwestern's astronomy center), "A Shout Across Time" is a multimedia performance combining astronomy visuals, narration, and live classical music performed by students from Northwestern's Bienen School of Music. Weather permitting, attendees will enjoy an outdoor telescope viewing after the show! Two pieces will be featured:

A SHOUT ACROSS TIME
A multimedia experience inspired by Einstein's theories on general relativity, black holes, and gravitational waves, with music composed by Ira Mowitz (originally part of the "Celebrating Einstein" project at Montana State University)

ECLIPSE
A new multimedia piece for brass quintet developed by astronomer and musician Kyle Kremer that highlights the upcoming 2017 Solar Eclipse. This piece will feature Northwestern University's Lake Shore Brass.

Directions & Parking
Nichols Concert Hall at the Music Institute of Chicago in Evanston

~ ~ ~

This event is organized by CIERA graduate student Kyle Kremer and is funded by CIERA Postdoctoral Fellow, Laura Sampson, who won a prestigious 2016 "For Women in Science" Fellowship from L'Oréal USA, in part to develop astronomy outreach programs. The event is part of Kyle Kremer's Cosmos in Concert initiative. Through multimedia shows, in-school residencies, and public outreach events, Cosmos in Concert introduces a new platform for science education and outreach.

Image credit: A. Riazuelo, IAP/UPMC/CNRS


Free and open to the public. No registration or ticket required. Campus parking lots are unrestricted after 4:00 pm.

CIERA Spring Interdisciplinary Colloquium:
How to Find a Transiting Exoplanet: Data-driven Discovery in the Astronomical Time Domain

Co-hosted by Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems (NICO) & the Data Science Initiative (DSI).

Dan Foreman-Mackey
University of Washington, Sagan Postdoctoral Fellow

Talk Abstract: Thousands of exoplanets have been discovered over the past few years. These discoveries were enabled by large and homogeneous space-based time domain surveys of nearby stars, including NASA's Kepler Mission. To push the exoplanet detection threshold to the smallest planets or the longest orbital periods using these data, we combine physical models of exoplanets with data-driven models of the stars and the spacecraft. Scaling these models to be applied to hundreds of thousands of stars with tens of thousands of measurements each poses an interesting technical challenge that we have solved in close interdisciplinary collaboration. In this talk, I will describe the current and future datasets, and the basic problem of exoplanet detection. I will go on to outline the technical challenges and present some of our solutions. Finally, I will discuss how we understand the place of our Solar System in the greater context of the population of planets using these discoveries.


Abstracts to be added.


calendar

Alexander Gurevich: TBA

May 18, 2017, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Title: TBA

Speaker: Alexander Gurevich, Old Dominion University

Abstract: TBA

Host: James Sauls


Title: New Probes of Old Structure: Cosmology with 21cm Intensity Mapping and the Cosmic Microwave Background

Speaker: Laura Newburgh, Yale

Abstract: Current cosmological measurements have left us with deep questions about our Universe: What caused the expansion of the Universe at the earliest times? How did structure form? What is Dark Energy and does it evolve with time? New experiments like CHIME, HIRAX, and ACTPol are poised to address these questions through 3-dimensional maps of structure and measurements of the polarized Cosmic Microwave Background. In this talk, I will describe how we will use 21cm intensity measurements from CHIME and HIRAX to place sensitive constraints on Dark Energy between redshifts 0.8 -- 2.5, a poorly probed era corresponding to when Dark Energy began to impact the expansion history of the Universe. I will also discuss how we will use data from new instruments on the ACT telescope to constrain cosmological parameters like the total neutrino mass and probe structure at late times.

Host: Ulmer

Speaker Schedule

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, colloquium


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

May 19, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

David Goldfinger: TBA

May 22, 2017, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

TTitle: TBA

Speaker: David Goldfinger, MIT
 

Abstract: TBA

 

 

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, HEP


What does it sound like when a composer is inspired by science?

Hear six original pieces of music created by Bienen School of Music composers, followed by short lectures describing the research that inspired their work.

-- Free and open to the public.
-- No registration or ticket required.
-- Campus parking lots are unrestricted after 4:00 pm.

The Science Sonification and Composition Project is a new collaboration at Northwestern University that partners scientists with composers from the Bienen School of Music. The goal is to create and perform new music compositions inspired by cutting-edge scientific research at Northwestern. This collaboration was developed in 2016 by musician-scientists Eric Schwenker and Kyle Kremer through Northwestern's Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA).


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Nanda Rea: TBA

May 23, 2017, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Title: TBA


Speaker: Nanda Rea, Institute of Space Sciences (CSIC-IEEC), Barcelona
API Astronomical Institute, University of Amsterdam

Host: Raffaella Margutti

Abstract: TBA

 

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, Astrophysics


calendar

Stephan Herminghaus: TBA

May 25, 2017, 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Title: TBA

Speaker: Stephan Herminghaus, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization; University of Göttingen

Abstract: TBA

Host: Adilson Motter

 

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, Complex Systems


Title: Revolutionizing Our Understanding of Disease: The Human Proteome Project

Speaker: Neil Kelleher, Northwestern University

Abstract: A worldwide effort led by Northwestern, the Cell-Based Human Proteome Project seeks to define all cell types and protein molecules within the human body, allowing us to revolutionize our understanding of human wellness and disease. Representing the next generation of the Human Genome Project, the Human Proteome Project also marks a transformative next step in our ability to understand and improve human health through technology. In this session, Neil Kelleher will share Northwestern’s role in the Human Proteome Project, including the project’s links to clinical research in areas such as organ transplantation, heart disease, and cancer, and its alignment with work on the Evanston and Chicago campuses.

Host: Ulmer

Speaker Schedule

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, colloquium


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

May 26, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


Abstracts to be added.


Northwestern University's Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) presents a SPECIAL PUBLIC LECTURE ON SUPERNOVAE

-- Free and open to the public.
-- No registration or ticket required.
-- Campus parking lots are unrestricted after 4:00 pm.

Dr. Edo Berger, Professor of Astronomy, Harvard University

Talk Title & Abstract:

Nature's Biggest Explosions: Past, Present, and Future
Somewhere in the universe a massive star ends its life in a cataclysmic explosion every second. These explosions play a critical role in shaping the Universe:  they are responsible for the creation and dispersal of the chemical building blocks of stars, planets, and life; they give birth to exotic objects such as neutron stars and black holes; and some are so powerful that they can be used to illuminate the infant universe.  In this talk I will review the history, present, and exciting future of how we study nature’s biggest explosions.

Image credit: Kris Snibbe


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

June 2, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

Ye-Ling Zhou: TBA [copy]

June 5, 2017, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Title: TBA

Speaker: Ye-Ling Zhou, Durham University
 

Abstract: TBA

 

 

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, HEP


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

June 9, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

June 16, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

June 23, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

June 30, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

July 7, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


Title: Trapped-ion quantum logic with near-field microwave-driven gates

Speaker: David Allcock, NIST Boulder

Abstract: Hyperfine qubits in laser-cooled trapped atomic ions are one of the most promising platforms for general-purpose quantum computing. Magnetic field insensitive ‘clock states’ and near-infinite lifetimes allow for minute-long memory coherence times as well as qubit frequencies that are in the convenient microwave domain [1]. Most work on these qubits has so far focussed on using lasers for gate operations, however there are several schemes that offer the prospect of performing all coherent operations using purely electronic methods [2,3]. These replace lasers with cheaper, smaller, more stable microwave devices with more straightforward phase control. Microwave elements can also be integrated into trapping structures more easily than their optical counterparts for improved scalability.


The latest results using near-field microwaves have demonstrated two-qubit gate fidelities of 99.7(1)% [4], as well as single-qubit state preparation, gates, memory and read-out fidelities exceeding 99.9% [1]. I will present the latest results on a new ion trap system being developed to exceed these fidelities whilst incorporating new functional elements. Foremost amongst these will be the addition of an auxiliary ion species and a multi-zone trap to enable arbitrary multi-qubit operations [5]. The important experimental techniques of cryogenic cooling and in-situ surface cleaning have also been incorporated.

[1] T. P. Harty et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 220501 (2014)
[2] C. Ospelkaus et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 090502 (2008)
[3] F. Mintert, and C. Wunderlich, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 257904 (2001)
[4] T. P. Harty et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 140501 (2016)
[5] D. J. Wineland et al. J. Res. Natl. Technol. 103, 259 (1998).

 

Host: Brian Odom

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, AMO


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

July 14, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

July 21, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

July 28, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

August 4, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

August 11, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

August 18, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

August 25, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

September 1, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

September 8, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

September 15, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

September 22, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

Dearborn Observatory Public Viewing

September 29, 2017, 9:00 PM - 11:00 PM

The Dearborn Observatory is open for public viewing every Friday night from 9 to 11 pm during the spring and summer months (Apr-Sept). The sessions are free and open to all. Reservations are required for the first hour but walk-ins are welcome in the second hour. All visitors should note that the dome is neither heated nor air-conditioned so please dress appropriately. Friday evening sessions are held "rain or shine." Unfortunately, the Dearborn is NOT ADA-accessible. Several staircases must be climbed in order to reach the telescope.For more information go to http://www.physics.northwestern.edu/observatory/

To make a reservation go to http://sites.northwestern.edu/dearborn/.


calendar

Thomas Udem: TBA

October 6, 2017, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Title: TBA

Speaker: Thomas Udem, Max-Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik  

Abstract: TBA

Host: Gabrielse

Speaker Schedule

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, colloquium

Department Conference Room Calendars

Tech F160    Tech F210     Dearborn 23