Events

Title: Galactic Very High Energy Astrophysics

Speaker: Alexis Popkow, UCLA
 

Abstract:

Despite being discovered over a hundred years ago, the origin of cosmic rays has remained a mystery. Recent clues suggest that a large number are accelerated in supernova remnants. The Cygnus region is a very active region of our Galaxy, with many sources of GeV and TeV gamma-ray emission, such as supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebulae, and massive star clusters. A detailed study of the Cygnus region can give insight into the processes of particle acceleration in astrophysical sources, and the nature of cosmic rays. VERITAS (Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System) is an array of four 12 meter diameter imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes located at Mt Hopkins, AZ, USA. From 2007 through 2012 it gathered nearly 300 hours of data in the Cygnus region from 67 to 82 degrees Galactic longitude and from -1 to 4 degrees in Galactic latitude. We are reanalyzing the VERITAS data with updated analysis techniques, and will be cross correlating that data with the results of an analysis of over five years of Fermi-LAT data in the region. Using a cross correlation of these results we can motivate continued observations in this active region of the Galaxy.

 

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, HEP


Title: Extending the Sensitivity of Directional Dark Matter Searches

Speaker: Nguyen Phan, University of New Mexico
 

Abstract:

The nature of dark matter remains one of the most important unresolved questions in physics. One of the leading candidates is a class of particles known as weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Measuring the direction of WIMP-induced nuclear recoils can provide a powerful and unambiguous signature for the detection of Galactic dark matter. Of the technologies currently employed to detect this signature, the low pressure Time Projection Chamber (TPC) is the most mature, but faces numerous challenges due to its low target density. We will highlight some of these challenges and describe ways to overcome them by maximizing sensitivity with a scalable, robust and low cost technology. Results from R&D work at the University of New Mexico that show progress towards these goals will be presented.

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, HEP


calendar

Dan Elliott, Purdue University

October 11, 2016, 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Title: TBA

Speaker: Dan Elliot

Abstract: TBA

Host: Brian Odom

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, AMO


calendar

Abigail Vieregg: TBA

October 21, 2016, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Title: TBA

Speaker: Abigail Vieregg, University of Chicago


Abstract: TBA

Host: Mel Ulmer

Speaker Schedule

Keywords: Physics, Astronomy, colloquium

Department Conference Room Calendars

Tech F160    Tech F210     Dearborn 23